Archive for the ‘Wireless’ Category

Heartbleed Affecting Wireless Users

Monday, June 2nd, 2014

New Vulnerability in Wireless Devices

Cupid Heartbleed Logo

Per Ars Techinca, a new wireless vulnerability has been detected in many wireless vendors implementation of enterprise grade wireless security wich affects wireless users. We are working with all of our vendors to find out (1) which are affected, and (2) what needs to be done to mediate this risk. Please stay tuned!

Wireless Case Studies: Cellular Repeater and DAS

Friday, February 7th, 2014

Gyver Networks recently designed and installed a cellular bi-directional amplifier (BDA) and distributed antenna system (DAS) for an internationally renowned preparatory and boarding school in Massachusetts.

BDA Challenge: Faculty, students, and visitors were unable to access any cellular voice or data services at one of this historic campus’ sports complexes; 3G and 4G cellular reception at the suburban Boston location were virtually nonexistent.

Of particular concern to the school was the fact that the safety of its student-athletes would be jeopardized in the event of a serious injury, with precious minutes lost as faculty were forced to scramble to find the nearest landline – or leave the building altogether in search of cellular signal – to contact first responders.

Additionally, since internal communications between management and facilities personnel around the campus took place via mobile phone, lack of cellular signal at the sports complex required staff to physically leave the site just to find adequate reception.

Resolution: Gyver Networks engineers performed a cellular site survey of selected carriers throughout the complex to acquire a precise snapshot of the RF environment. After selecting the optimal donor tower signal for each cell carrier, Gyver then engineered and installed a distributed antenna system (DAS) to retransmit the amplified signal put out by the bi-directional amplifier (BDA) inside the building.

The high-gain, dual-band BDA chosen for the system offered scalability across selected cellular and PCS bands, as well as the flexibility to reconfigure band settings on an as-needed basis, providing enhancement capabilities for all major carriers now and in the future.

Every objective set forth by the school’s IT department has been satisfied with the deployment of this cellular repeater and DAS: All areas of the athletic complex now enjoy full 3G and 4G voice and data connectivity; safety and liability concerns have been mitigated; and campus personnel are able to maintain mobile communications regardless of where they are in the complex.

The case for Wi-Fi in the Internet of Things

Tuesday, January 14th, 2014

Whether it’s the “connected home” or the “Internet of Things,” many everyday home appliances and devices will soon feature some form of Internet connectivity. What form should that connectivity take? We sat down with Edgar Figueroa, president and CEO of the Wi-Fi Alliance, to discuss his belief that Wi-Fi is the clear choice.

Options are plentiful when it comes to the Internet, but some are easily disregarded for most Internet of Things designs. Ethernet and other wired solutions require additional equipment or more cabling than what is typically found in even a modern home. Cellular connectivity is pointless for stationary home goods and still too power-hungry for wearable items. Proprietary and purpose-built solutions, like ZigBee, are either too closed off or require parallel paths to solutions that are already in our homes.

Bluetooth makes a pretty good case for itself, though inconsistent user experiences remain the norm for several reasons. The latest Bluetooth specifications provide very low power data transfers and have very low overhead for maintaining a connection. The result is that the power profile for the connection is low whether you’re transacting data or not. Connection speeds are modest compared to the alternatives. But the biggest detractor for Bluetooth is inconsistency. Bluetooth has always felt kludgy; it’s an incomplete solution that will suffice until it improves. It’s helpful that Bluetooth devices can often have their performance, reliability, and features improved upon through software updates, but the experience can still remain frustrating.

Then there’s Wi-Fi.

Figueroa wanted to highlight a few key points from a study the Alliance commissioned. “Of those polled, more than half already have a non-traditional device with a Wi-Fi radio,” he said. Here, “non-traditional” falls among a broad swath of products that includes appliances, thermostats, and lighting systems. Figueroa continued, “Ninety-one percent of those polled said they’d be more likely to buy a smart device if it came equipped with Wi-Fi.” Alliance’s point: everyone already has a Wi-Fi network in their home. Why choose anything else?

One key consideration the study seems to ignore is power draw, which is one of Bluetooth’s biggest assets. Wi-Fi connections are active and power-hungry, even when they aren’t transacting large amounts of data. A separate study looking at power consumption per bit of data transferred demonstrated that Wi-Fi trumps Bluetooth by orders of magnitude. Where Wi-Fi requires large amounts of constant power, Bluetooth requires almost no power to maintain a connection.

In response to a question on the preference for low-power interfaces, Figueroa said simply, “Why?” In his eyes, the connected home isn’t necessarily a battery-powered home. Devices that connect to our Wi-Fi networks traditionally have plugs, so why must they sip almost no power?

Bluetooth has its place in devices whose current draw must not exceed the capabilities of a watch battery. But even in small devices, Wi-Fi’s performance and ability to create ad hoc networks and Wi-Fi Direct connections can better the experience, even if it’s at the risk of increasing power draw and battery size.

In the end, the compelling case for Wi-Fi’s use in the mobile space has more to do with what we want from our experiences than whether one is more power-hungry. Simplicity in all things is preferred. Even after all these years, pairing Bluetooth is usually more complex than connecting a new device to your existing Wi-Fi network. Even in the car, where Bluetooth has had a long dominance, the ability to connect multiple devices over Wi-Fi’s wide interface may ultimately be preferred. Still, despite Figueroa’s confidence, it’s an increasingly green (and preferably bill-shrinking) world looking to adopt an Internet of Things lifestyle. Wi-Fi may ultimately need to complete its case by driving power down enough to reside in all our Internet of Things devices, from the biggest to the smallest.

Source:  arstechnica.com

New modulation scheme said to be ‘breakthrough’ in network performance

Friday, December 20th, 2013

A startup plans to demonstrate next month a new digital modulation scheme that promises to dramatically boost bandwidth, capacity, and range, with less power and less distortion, on both wireless and wired networks.

MagnaCom, a privately held company based in Israel, now has more than 70 global patent applications, and 15 issued patents in the U.S., for what it calls and has trademarked Wave Modulation (or WAM), which is designed to replace the long-dominant quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM) used in almost every wired or wireless product today on cellular, microwave radio, Wi-Fi, satellite and cable TV, and optical fiber networks. The company revealed today that it plans to demonstrate WAM at the Consumer Electronics Show, Jan. 7-10, in Las Vegas.

The vendor, which has released few specifics about WAM, promises extravagant benefits: up to 10 decibels of additional gain compared to the most advanced QAM schemes today; up to 50 percent less power; up to 400 percent more distance; up to 50 percent spectrum savings. WAM tolerates noise or interference better, has lower costs, is 100 percent backward compatible with existing QAM-based systems; and can simply be swapped in for QAM technology without additional changes to other components, the company says.

Modulation is a way of conveying data by changing some aspect of a carrier signal (sometimes called a carrier wave). A very imperfect analogy is covering a lamp with your hand to change the light beam into a series of long and short pulses, conveying information based on Morse code.

QAM, which is both an analog and a digital modulation scheme, “conveys two analog message signals, or two digital bit streams, by changing the amplitudes of two carrier waves,” as the Wikipedia entry explains. It’s used in Wi-Fi, microwave backhaul, optical fiber systems, digital cable television and many other communications systems. Without going into the technical details, you can make QAM more efficient or denser. For example, nearly all Wi-Fi radios today use 64-QAM. But 802.11ac radios can use 256-QAM. In practical terms, that change boosts the data rate by about 33 percent.

But there are tradeoffs. The denser the QAM scheme, the more vulnerable it is to electronic “noise.” And amplifying a denser QAM signal requires bigger, more powerful amplifiers: when they run at higher power, which is another drawback, they also introduce more distortion.

MagnaCom claims that WAM modulation delivers vastly greater performance and efficiencies than current QAM technology, while minimizing if not eliminating the drawbacks. But so far, it’s not saying how WAM actually does that.

“It could be a breakthrough, but the company has not revealed all that’s needed to assure the world of that,” says Will Straus, president of Forward Concepts, a market research firm that focuses on digital signal processing, cell phone chips, wireless communications and related markets. “Even if the technology proves in, it will take many years to displace QAM that’s already in all digital communications. That’s why only bounded applications — where WAM can be [installed] at both ends – will be the initial market.”

“There are some huge claims here,” says Earl Lum, founder of EJL Wireless, a market research firm that focuses on microwave backhaul, cellular base station, and related markets. “They’re not going into exactly how they’re doing this, so it’s really tough to say that this technology is really working.”

Lum, who originally worked as an RF design engineer before switching to wireless industry equities research on Wall Street, elaborated on two of those claims: WAM’s greater distance and its improved spectral efficiency.

“Usually as you go higher in modulation, the distance shrinks: it’s inversely proportional,” he explains. “So the 400 percent increase in distance is significant. If they can compensate and still get high spectral efficiency and keep the distance long, that’s what everyone is trying to have.”

The spectrum savings of up to 50 percent is important, too. “You might be able to double the amount of channels compared to what you have now,” Lum says. “If you can cram more channels into that same spectrum, you don’t have to buy more [spectrum] licenses. That’s significant in terms of how many bits-per-hertz you can realize. But, again, they haven’t specified how they do this.”

According to MagnaCom, WAM uses some kind of spectral compression to improve spectral efficiency. WAM can simply be substituted for existing QAM technology in any product design. Some of WAM’s features should result in simpler transmitter designs that are less expensive and use less power.

For the CES demonstration next month, MagnaCom has partnered with Altera Corp., which provides custom field programmable gate arrays, ASICs and other custom logic solutions.

Source:  networkworld.com

FCC postpones spectrum auction until mid 2015

Monday, December 9th, 2013

In a blog post on Friday, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Tom Wheeler said that he would postpone a June 2014 spectrum auction to mid-2015. In his post, Wheeler called for more extensive testing of “the operating systems and the software necessary to conduct the world’s first-of-a kind incentive auction.”

”Only when our software and systems are technically ready, user friendly, and thoroughly tested, will we start the auction,” wrote Wheeler. The chairman also said that he wanted to develop procedures for how the auction will be conducted, specifically after seeking public comment on those details in the second half of next year.

A separate auction for 10MHz of space will take place in January 2014. In 2012, Congress passed the Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act, which required the FCC to auction off 65MHz of spectrum by 2015. Revenue from the auction will go toward developing FirstNet, an LTE network for first responders. Two months ago, acting FCC chair Mignon Clyburn announced that the commission would start that sell-off by placing 10MHz on the auction block in January 2014. The other 55MHz would be auctioned off at a later date, before the end of 2015.

The forthcoming auction aims to pay TV broadcasters to give up lower frequencies, which will be bid on by wireless cell phone carriers like AT&T and Verizon, but also by smaller carriers who are eager to expand their spectrum property. Wheeler gave no hint as to whether he would push for restrictions on big carriers during the auction process, but he wrote, “I am mindful of the important national interest in making available additional spectrum for flexible use.”

Source:  arstechnica.com

Case Studies: Point-to-point wireless bridge – Campus

Friday, December 6th, 2013

IMG_0095

Gyver Networks recently completed a point-to-point (PTP) bridge installation to provide wireless backhaul for a Boston college

Challenge:  The only connectivity to local network or Internet resources from this school’s otherwise modern athletic center was via a T1 line topping out at 1.5 Mbps bandwidth.  This was unacceptable not only to the faculty onsite attempting to connect to the school’s network, but to the attendees, faculty, and media outlets attempting to connect to the Internet during the high-profile events and press conferences routinely held inside.

Another vendor’s design for a 150 Mbps unlicensed wireless backhaul link failed during a VIP visit, necessitating a redesign by Gyver Networks.

http://www.gyvernetworks.com/TechBlog/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/IMG_0103.jpgResolution:  After performing a spectrum analysis of the surrounding environment, Gyver Networks determined that the wireless solution originally proposed to the school was not viable due to RF spectrum interference.

For a price point close to the unlicensed, failed design, Gyver Networks engineered a secure, 700 Mbps point-to-point wireless bridge in the licensed 80GHz band to link the main campus with the athletic center, providing adequate bandwidth for both local network and Internet connectivity at the remote site.  Faculty are now able to work without restriction, and event attendees can blog, post to social media, and upload photos and videos without constraint.

HP: 90 percent of Apple iOS mobile apps show security vulnerabilities

Tuesday, November 19th, 2013

HP today said security testing it conducted on more than 2,000 Apple iOS mobile apps developed for commercial use by some 600 large companies in 50 countries showed that nine out of 10 had serious vulnerabilities.

Mike Armistead, HP vice president and general manager, said testing was done on apps from 22 iTunes App Store categories that are used for business-to-consumer or business-to-business purposes, such as banking or retailing. HP said 97 percent of these apps inappropriately accessed private information sources within a device, and 86 percent proved to be vulnerable to attacks such as SQL injection.

The Apple guidelines for developing iOS apps help developers but this doesn’t go far enough in terms of security, says Armistead. Mobile apps are being used to extend the corporate website to mobile devices, but companies in the process “are opening up their attack surfaces,” he says.

In its summary of the testing, HP said 86 percent of the apps tested lacked the means to protect themselves from common exploits, such as misuse of encrypted data, cross-site scripting and insecure transmission of data.

The same number did not have optimized security built in the early part of the development process, according to HP. Three quarters “did not use proper encryption techniques when storing data on mobile devices, which leaves unencrypted data accessible to an attacker.” A large number of the apps didn’t implement SSL/HTTPS correctly.To discover weaknesses in apps, developers need to involve practices such as app scanning for security, penetration testing and a secure coding development life-cycle approach, HP advises.

The need to develop mobile apps quickly for business purposes is one of the main contributing factors leading to weaknesses in these apps made available for public download, according to HP. And the weakness on the mobile side is impacting the server side as well.

“It is our earnest belief that the pace and cost of development in the mobile space has hampered security efforts,” HP says in its report, adding that “mobile application security is still in its infancy.”

Source:  infoworld.com

Researchers find way to increase range of wireless frequencies in smartphones

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Researchers have found a new way to tune the radio frequency in smartphones and other wireless devices that promises to reduce costs and improve performance of semiconductors used in defense, satellite and commercial communications.

Semiconductor Research Corp. (SRC) and Northeastern University in Boston presented the research findings at the 58th Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference in Denver this week.

Nian Sun, associate professor of electrical and computer engineering at Northeastern, said he’s been working on the process since 2006, when he received National Science Foundation grants for the research.

“In September, we had a breakthrough,” he said in a telephone interview. “We didn’t celebrate with champagne exactly, but we were happy.”

The research progressed through a series of about 20 stages over the past seven years. It wasn’t like the hundreds of failures that the Wright brothers faced in coming up with a working wing design, but there were gradual improvements at each stage, he said.

Today, state-of-the art radio frequency circuits in smartphones rely on tuning done with radio frequency (RF) varactors, a kind of capacitor. But the new process allows tuning in inductors as well, which could enhance a smartphone’s tunable frequency range from 50% to 200%, Sun said. Tuning is how a device finds an available frequency to complete a wireless transmission. It’s not very different from turning a dial on an FM radio receiver to bring in a signal.

Capacitors and inductors work in electronic circuits to move electrons; inductors change the direction of electrons in a circuit, while capacitors do not.

Most smartphones use 15 to 20 frequency channels to make connections, but the new inductors made possible by the research will potentially more than double the number of channels available on a smartphone or other device. The new inductors are a missing link long sought for in ways to upgrade the RF tunable frequency range in a tuned circuit.

“Researchers have been trying a while to make inductors tunable — to change the inductance value — and haven’t been very successful,” said Kwok Ng, senior director of device sciences at SRC. He said SRC has worked with Northeastern since 2011 on the project, investing up to $300,000 in the research work.

How it worked: Researchers at the Northeastern lab used a thin magnetic piezoelectric film deposit in an experimental inductor about a centimeter square, using microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) processes . Piezoelectricity is an electromechanical interaction between the mechanical and electric states in a crystalline material. A crystal can acquire a charge when subjected to AC voltage.

What the researchers found is they could apply the right amount of voltage on a layer of metal going around a core of piezoelectric film to change its permeability. As the film changes permeability, its electrons can move at different frequencies.

Ng said the research means future inductors can be used to improve radio signal performance, which could eliminate the number of modules needed in a smartphone, with the potential to reduce the cost of materials.

Intel and Texas Instruments cooperated in the work, and the new inductor technology will be available for further industrial development by the middle of next year, followed by use in consumer applications by as earlier as late 2014.

Source:  networkworld.com

FCC crowdsources mobile broadband research with Android app

Friday, November 8th, 2013

Most smartphone users know data speeds can vary widely. But how do the different carriers stack up against each other? The Federal Communications Commission is hoping the public can help figure that out, using a new app it will preview next week.

The FCC on Friday said that the agenda for next Thursday’s open meeting, the first under new Chairman Tom Wheeler, will feature a presentation on a new Android smartphone app that will be used to crowdsource measurements of mobile broadband speeds. 

The FCC announced it would start measuring the performance of mobile networks last September. All four major wireless carriers, as well CTIA-The Wireless Association have already agreed to participate in the app, which is called “FCC Speed Test.” It works only on Android for now — no word on when an iPhone version might be available.

While the app has been in the works for a long time, its elevation to this month’s agenda reaffirms something Wheeler told the Journal this week. During that conversation, the Chairman repeatedly emphasized his desire to “make decisions based on facts.” Given the paucity of information on mobile broadband availability and prices, this type of data collection seems like the first step toward evaluating whether Americans are getting what they pay for from their carriers in terms of mobile data speeds.

The FCC unveiled its first survey of traditional land-based broadband providers in August 2011, which showed that most companies provide access that comes close to or exceeds advertised speeds. (Those results prompted at least one Internet service provider to increase its performance during peak hours.) Expanding the data collection effort to the mobile broadband is a natural step; smartphone sales outpace laptop sales and a significant portion of Americans (particularly minorities and low-income households) rely on a smartphone as their primary connection to the Internet.

Wheeler has said ensuring there is adequate competition in the broadband and wireless markets is among his top priorities. But first the FCC must know what level of service Americans are getting from their current providers. If mobile broadband speeds perform much as advertised, it would bolster the case of those who argue the wireless market is sufficiently competitive. But if any of the major carriers were to seriously under-perform, it would raise questions about the need for intervention from federal regulators.

Source:  wsj.com

High-gain patch antennas boost Wi-Fi capacity for Georgia Tech

Tuesday, November 5th, 2013

To boost its Wi-Fi capacity in packed lecture halls, Georgia Institute of Technology gave up trying to cram in more access points, with conventional omni-directional antennas, and juggle power settings and channel plans. Instead, it turned to new high-gain directional antennas, from Tessco’s Ventev division.

Ventev’s new TerraWave High-Density Ceiling Mount Antenna, which looks almost exactly like the bottom half of a small pizza box, focuses the Wi-Fi signal from the ceiling mounted Cisco access point in a precise cone-shaped pattern, covering part of the lecture hall floor. Instead of the flakey, laggy connections, about which professors had been complaining, users now consistently get up to 144Mbps (if they have 802.11n client radios).

“Overall, the system performed much better” with the Ventev antennas, says William Lawrence, IT project manager principal with the university’s academic and research technologies group. “And there was a much more even distribution of clients across the room’s access points.”

Initially, these 802.11n access points were running 40-MHz channels, but Lawrence’s team eventually switched to the narrower 20 MHz. “We saw more consistent performance for clients in the 20-MHz channel, and I really don’t know why,” he says. “It seems like the clients were doing a lot of shifting between using 40 MHz and 20 MHz. With the narrower channel, it was very smooth and consistent: we got great video playback.”

With the narrower channel, 11n clients can’t achieve their maximum 11n throughput. But that doesn’t seem to have been a problem in these select locations, Lawrence says. “We’ve not seen that to be an issue, but we’re continuing to monitor it,” he says.

The Atlanta main campus has a fully-deployed Cisco WLAN, with about 3,900 access points, nearly all supporting 11n, and 17 wireless controllers. Virtually all of the access points use a conventional, omni-directional antenna, which radiates energy in a globe-shaped configuration with the access point at the center. But in high density classrooms, faculty and students began complaining of flakey connections and slow speeds.

The problem, Lawrence says, was the surging number of Wi-Fi devices actively being used in big classrooms and lectures halls, coupled with Wi-Fi signals, especially in the 2.4-GHz band, stepping on each other over wide sections of the hall, creating co-channel interference.

One Georgia Tech network engineer spent a lot of time monitoring the problem areas and working with students and faculty. In a few cases, the problems could be traced to a client-side configuration problem. But “with 120 clients on one access point, performance really goes downhill,” Lawrence says. “With the omni-directional antenna, you can only pack the access points so close.”

Shifting users to the cleaner 5 GHz was an obvious step but in practice was rarely feasible: many mobile devices still support only 2.4-GHz connections; and client radios often showed a stubborn willfulness in sticking with a 2.4-GHz connection on a distant access point even when another was available much closer.

Consulting with Cisco, Georgia Tech decided to try some newer access points, with external antenna mounts, and selected one of Cisco’s certified partners, Tessco’s Ventev Wireless Infrastructure division, to supply the directional antennas. The TerraWave products also are compatible with access points from Aruba, Juniper, Meru, Motorola and others.

Patch antennas focus the radio beam within a specific area. (A couple of vendors, Ruckus Wireless and Xirrus, have developed their own built-in “smart” antennas that adjust and focus Wi-Fi signals on clients.) Depending on the beamwidth, the effect can be that of a floodlight or a spotlight, says Jeff Lime, Ventev’s vice president. Ventev’s newest TerraWave High-Density products focus the radio beam within narrower ranges than some competing products, and offer higher gain (in effect putting more oomph into the signal to drive it further), he says.

One model, with a maximum power of 20 watts, can have beam widths of 18 or 28 inches vertically, and 24 or 40 inches horizontally, with a gain of 10 or 11 dBi, depending on the frequency range. The second model, with a 50-watt maximum power output, has a beamwidth in both dimension of 35 degrees, at a still higher gain of 14 dBi to drive the spotlighted signal further, in really big areas like a stadium.

At Georgia Tech, each antenna focused the Wi-Fi signal from a specific overhead access point to cover a section of seats below it. Fewer users associate with each access point. The result is a kind of virtuous circle. “It gives more capacity per user, so more bandwidth, so a better user experience,” says Lime.

The antennas come with a quartet of 36-inch cables to connect to the access points. The idea is to give IT groups maximum flexibility. But the cables initially were awkward for the IT team installing the antennas. Lawrence says they experimented with different ways of neatly and quickly wrapping up the excess cable to keep it out of the way between the access point proper and the antenna panel [see photo, below]. They also had to modify mounting clips to get them to hold in the metal grid that forms the dropped ceiling in some of the rooms. “Little things like that can cause you some unexpected issues,” Lawrence says.

Georgia Tech wifiThe IT staff worked with Cisco engineers to reset a dedicated controller to handle the new “high density group” of access points; and the controller automatically handled configuration tasks like setting access point power levels and selecting channels.

Another issue is that when the patch antennas were ceiling mounted in second- or third-story rooms, their downward-shooting signal cone reached into the radio space of access points in the floor below. Lawrence says they tweaked the position of the antennas in some cases to send the spotlight signal beaming at an angle. “I look at each room and ask ‘how am I going to deploy these antennas to minimize signal bleed-through into other areas,” he says. “Adding a high-gain antenna can have unintended consequences outside the space it’s intended for.”

But based on improved throughput and consistent signals, Lawrence says it’s likely the antennas will be used in a growing number of lecture halls and other spaces on the main and satellite campuses. “This is the best solution we’ve got for now,” he says.

Source:  networkworld.com

FCC lays down spectrum rules for national first-responder network

Tuesday, October 29th, 2013

The agency will also start processing applications for equipment certification

The U.S. moved one step closer to having a unified public safety network on Monday when the Federal Communications Commission approved rules for using spectrum set aside for the system.

Also on Monday, the agency directed its Office of Engineering and Technology to start processing applications from vendors to have their equipment certified to operate in that spectrum.

The national network, which will operate in the prized 700MHz band, is intended to replace a patchwork of systems used by about 60,000 public safety agencies around the country. The First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet) would operate the system and deliver services on it to those agencies. The move is intended to enable better coordination among first responders and give them more bandwidth for transmitting video and other rich data types.

The rules approved by the FCC include power limits and other technical parameters for operating in the band. Locking them down should help prevent harmful interference with users in adjacent bands and drive the availability of equipment for FirstNet’s network, the agency said.

A national public safety network was recommended by a task force that reviewed the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks on the U.S. The Middle Class Tax Relief and Job Creation Act of 2012 called for auctions of other spectrum to cover the cost of the network, which was estimated last year at US$7 billion.

The public safety network is required to cover 95 percent of the U.S., including all 50 states, the District of Columbia and U.S. territories. It must reach 98 percent of the country’s population.

Source:  computerworld.com

Motorola looking to exit wireless LAN business – sources

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Motorola Solutions Inc is exploring the sale of its underperforming wireless LAN business, which has grappled with declining share in a market dominated by rivals such as Cisco Systems Inc, people familiar with the matter said.

An exit from the wireless LAN market would come as Motorola, the provider of data communications and telecommunications equipment, seeks to focus on its core government and public safety division.

Motorola Solutions, which succeeded Motorola Inc following the spin-off of the mobile phones business into Motorola Mobility in 2011, provides communication services for the U.S. government and other enterprise customers. Motorola Mobility was later sold to Google Inc for $12.5 billion.

The wireless local area network unit, which is under Motorola Solutions’ enterprise division, has struggled amid competition from top players including Aruba Networks Inc and Hewlett-Packard Co, as well as smaller players such as Ubiquiti Networks Inc.

“It’s a tough market. It’s being squeezed from the top by Cisco and from the bottom by Ubiquiti,” said one of the people familiar with the matter, adding that the talks are at an early stage.

The people asked not to be named because the matter is confidential. Motorola declined to comment.

The Motorola unit’s revenues declined by a mid-single digit percentage point in the second quarter, following a massive 30 percent decline in the first quarter. The business had $216.7 million in 2012 revenues, roughly 8 percent of the $2.71 billion enterprise business.

The global enterprise wireless LAN business is expected to be a $4 billion market for 2013, according to research firm Dell’Oro group. Cisco is the market leader, with nearly 55 percent of the market segment revenue, followed by Aruba at just over 12 percent.

The value of Motorola’s wireless LAN business could not be determined.

Motorola Solutions, which has a market value of just over $16 billion, dominates the two-way radio market with its land-mobile-radio systems and public-safety products, and the U.S. government is its largest customer. The company’s government business brought in nearly 70 percent of its total revenue last year.

The attempt to shed the wireless LAN unit follows other divestitures Motorola Solutions has undertaken since 2011.

The company sold its wireless network assets to Nokia Siemens Networks for $975 million in 2011, and later that year sold small broadband networks units to buyout firm Vector Capital for an undisclosed sum.

Motorola Solutions cut its revenue forecast in July for the second time in three months because of declines in its enterprise business.

Earlier this year, the company’s chief executive said that revenue declines in the wireless LAN business were due to a “failure to execute” rather than market forces, and said the company had not done a “good enough job” selling wireless LAN products as part of its managed service offering, rather than as stand alone products.

“We have consistently lost share in WLAN and we just haven’t executed that well. Now it is a little bit more embryonic in terms of our strategic change from product to managed services but we’ve got to do a better job,” Chief Executive Greg Brown told analysts in April.

Meanwhile, Motorola Solutions is offering a voluntary buyout program to select employees in North America, or less than 20 percent of the company’s global workforce, a spokesperson for the company said on Friday. A few hundred employees are expected to participate in the separation program, the spokesperson added.

Source:  Reuters

Wireless networks that follow you around a room, optimize themselves and even talk to each other out loud

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

Graduate students at the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory showed off their latest research at the university’s Wireless retreat on Monday, outlining software-defined MIMO, machine-generated TCP optimization, and a localized wireless networking technique that works through sound.

Swarun Kumar’s presentation on OpenRF – a Wi-Fi architecture designed to allow multiple access points to avoid mutual interference and focus signals on active clients – detailed how commodity hardware can be used to take advantage of features otherwise restricted to more specialized devices.

There were several constraints in the 802.11n wireless standard that had to be overcome, Kumar said, including a limitation on the total number of bits per subcarrier signal that could be manipulated, as well as restricting that manipulation to one out of every two such signals.

Simply disabling the Carrier Sense restrictions, however, proved an incomplete solution.

“Access points often send these beacon packets, which are meant for all clients in a network … you cannot null them at any point if you’re a client. Unfortunately, these packets will now collide” in the absence of Carrier Sense, he said.

The solution – which involved two separate transmit queues – enabled OpenRF to automatically apply its optimal settings across multiple access points, distributing the computational workload across the access points, rather than having to rely on a beefy central controller.

Kumar said the system can boost TCP throughput by a factor of 1.6 compared to bare-bones 802.11n.

*

Keith Winstein attacked the problem of TCP throughput slightly differently, however. Using a specialized algorithm called Remy – into which users can simply input network parameters and desired performance standards – he said that networks can essentially determine the best ways to configure themselves on their own.

“So these are the inputs, and the output is a congestion control algorithm,” he said. “Now this is not an easy process – this is replacing a human protocol designer. Now, it costs like $10 to get a new protocol on Amazon EC2.”

Remy works via the heuristic principle of concentrating its efforts on the use cases where a small change in the rules results in a major change in the outcome, allowing it to optimize effectively and to shift gears quickly if network conditions change.

“Computer generated end-to-end algorithms can actually outperform human generated in-network algorithms, and in addition, human generated end-to-end algorithms,” said Winstein.

Even though Remy wasn’t designed or optimized to handle wireless networks, it still handily outperforms human-generated competition, he added.

*

Peter Iannucci is a researcher looking into highly localized ways of providing wireless Internet, which he refers to as room area networks. Having dismissed a number of technologies as insufficient – Bluetooth was too clunky, NFC had limited uptake – he eventually settled on sound.

Iannucci’s acoustic network – which he has dubbed Blurt – uses high-frequency sounds to transmit the ones and zeroes of a network connection. It’s well-suited for a network confined by design to a small space.

“Acoustic networks provide great low-leakage properties, since doors and walls are intentionally sound-absorbent,” he said. “[They] work over moderate distances, using existing devices, and they don’t require any setup for ad hoc communications.”

Iannucci acknowledges that Blurt isn’t without its problems. Given that sound waves move about a million times slower than radio waves, speed is an issue – he said that Blurt can handle about 200 bits per second when using frequencies inaudible to humans, with more speed possible only at the cost of an audible whirring chirp, reminiscent of old telephone modems.

But that’s really not the point – the idea would be more to do things like verify users of a business’ free Wi-Fi are actually sitting in the restaurant, or any other tasks involving heavily location-dependent network services.

Source: networkworld.com

802.11ac ‘gigabit Wi-Fi’ starts to show potential, limits

Monday, October 7th, 2013

Vendor tests and very early 802.11ac customers provide a reality check on “gigabit Wi-Fi” but also confirm much of its promise.

Vendors have been testing their 11ac products for months, yielding data that show how 11ac performs and what variables can affect performance. Some of the tests are under ideal laboratory-style conditions; others involve actual or simulated production networks. Among the results: consistent 400M to 800Mbps throughput for 11ac clients in best-case situations, higher throughput as range increases compared to 11n, more clients serviced by each access point, and a boost in performance for existing 11n clients.

Wireless LAN vendors are stepping up product introductions, and all of them are coming out with products, among them Aerohive, Aruba Networks, Cisco (including its Meraki cloud-based offering), Meru, Motorola Solutions, Ruckus, Ubiquiti, and Xirrus.

The IEEE 802.11ac standard does several things to triple the throughput of 11n. It builds on some of the technologies introduced in 802.11n; makes mandatory some 11n options; offers several ways to dramatically boost Wi-Fi throughput; and works solely in the under-used 5GHz band.

It’s a potent combination. “We are seeing over 800Mbps on the new Apple 11ac-equipped Macbook Air laptops, and 400Mbps on the 11ac phones, such as the new Samsung Galaxy S4, that [currently] make up the bulk of 11ac devices on campus,” says Mike Davis, systems programmer, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware.

A long-time Aruba Networks WLAN customer, the university has installed 3,700 of Aruba’s new 11ac access points on campus this summer, in a new engineering building, two new dorms, and some large auditoriums. Currently, there are on average about 80 11ac clients online with a peak of 100, out of some 24,000 Wi-Fi clients on campus.

The 11ac network seems to bear up under load. “In a limited test with an 11ac Macbook Air, I was able to sustain 400Mbps on an 11ac access point that was loaded with over 120 clients at the time,” says Davis. Not all of the clients were “data hungry,” but the results showed “that the new 11ac access points could still supply better-than-11n data rates while servicing more clients than before,” Davis says.

The maximum data rates for 11ac are highly dependent on several variables. One is whether the 11ac radios are using 80 Mhz-wide channels (11n got much of its throughput boost by being able to use 40 MHz channels). Another is whether the radios are able to use the 256 QAM modulation scheme, compared to the 64 QAM for 11n. Both of these depend on how close the 11ac clients are to the access point. Too far, and the radios “step down” to narrower channels and lower modulations.

Another variable is the number of “spatial streams,” a technology introduced with 11n, supported by the client and access point radios. Chart #1, “802.11ac performance based on spatial streams,” shows the download throughput performance.

802.11ac

In perfect conditions, close to the access point, a three-stream 11ac radio can achieve the maximum raw data rate of 1.3Gbps. But no users will actually realize that in terms of useable throughput.

“Typically, if the client is close to the access point, you can expect to lose about 40% of the overall raw bit rate due to protocol overhead – acknowledgements, setup, beaconing and so on,” says Mathew Gast, director of product management, for Aerohive Networks, which just announced its first 11ac products, the AP370 and AP390. Aerohive incorporates controller functions in a distributed access point architecture and provides a cloud-based management interface for IT groups.

“A single [11ac] client that’s very close to the access point in ideal conditions gets very good speed,” says Gast. “But that doesn’t reflect reality: you have electronic ‘noise,’ multiple contending clients, the presence of 11n clients. In some cases, the [11ac] speeds might not be much higher than 11n.”

A third key variable is the number of spatial streams, supported by both access points and clients. Most of the new 11ac access points will support three streams, usually with three transmit and three receive antennas. But clients will vary. At the University of Delaware, the new Macbook Air laptops support two streams; but the new Samsung Galaxy S4 and HTC One phones support one stream, via Broadcom’s BCM4335 11ac chipset.

Tests by Broadcom found that a single 11n data stream over a 40 MHz channel can deliver up to 60Mbps. By comparison, single-stream 11ac in an 80 MHz channels is “starting at well over 250Mbps,” says Chris Brown, director of business development for Broadcom’s wireless connectivity unit. Single-stream 11ac will max out at about 433Mbps.

There are some interesting results from these qualities. One is that the throughput at any given distance from the access point is much better in 11ac compared to 11n. “Even at 60 meters, single-stream 11ac outperforms all but the 2×2 11n at 40 MHz,” Brown says.

Another result is that 11ac access points can service a larger number of clients than 11n access points.

“We have replaced several dozen 11n APs with 11ac in a high-density lecture hall, with great success,” says University of Delaware’s Mike Davis. “While we are still restricting the maximum number of clients that can associate with the new APs, we are seeing them maintain client performance even as the client counts almost double from what the previous generation APs could service.”

Other features of 11ac help to sustain these capacity gains. Transmit beam forming (TBF), which was an optional feature in 11n is mandatory and standardized in 11ac. “TBR lets you ‘concentrate’ the RF signal in a specific direction, for a specific client,” says Mark Jordan, director, technical marketing engineering, Aruba Networks. “TBF changes the phasing slightly to allow the signals to propagate at a higher effective radio power level. The result is a vastly improved throughput-over-distance.”

A second feature is low density parity check (LDPC), which is a technique to improve the sensitivity of the receiving radio, in effect giving it better “hearing.”

The impact in Wi-Fi networks will be significant. Broadcom did extensive testing in a network set up in an office building, using both 11n and 11ac access points and clients. It specifically tested 11ac data rates and throughput with beam forming and low density parity check switched off and on, according to Brown.

Tests showed that 11ac connections with both TBR and LDPC turned on, increasingly and dramatically outperformed 11n – and even 11ac with both features turned off – as the distance between client and access point increased. For example, at one test point, an 11n client achieved 32Mbps. At the same point, the 11ac client with TBR and LDPC turned “off,” achieved about the same. But when both were turned “on,” the 11ac client soared to 102Mbps, more than three times the previous throughput.

Aruba found similar results. Its single-stream Galaxy S4 smartphone reached 238Mbps TCP downstream throughput at 15 feet, 235Mbps at 30 feet, and 193Mbps at 75 feet. At 120 feet, it was still 154Mbps. For the same distances upstream the throughput rates were: 235Mbps, 230M, 168M, and 87M.

“We rechecked that several times, to make sure we were doing it right, says Aruba’s Jordan. “We knew we couldn’t get the theoretical maximums. But now, we can support today’s clients with all the data they demand. And we can do it with the certainty of such high rates-at-range that we can come close to guaranteeing a high quality [user] experience.”

There are still other implications with 11ac. Because of the much higher up and down throughput, 11ac mobile devices get on and off the Wi-Fi channel much faster compared to 11n, drawing less power from the battery. The more efficient network use will mean less “energy per bit,” and better battery life.

A related implication is that because this all happens much faster with 11ac, there’s more time for other clients to access the channel. In other words, network capacity increases by up to six times, according to Broadcom’s Brown. “That frees up time for other clients to transmit and receive,” he says.

That improvement can be used to reduce the number of access points covering a given area: in the Broadcom office test area, four Cisco 11n access points provided connectivity. A single 11n access point could replace them, says Brown.

But more likely, IT groups will optimize 11ac networks for capacity, especially as the number of smartphones, tablets, laptops and other gear are outfitted with 11ac radios.

Even 11n clients will see improvement in 11ac networks, as University of Delaware has found.

“The performance of 11n clients on the 11ac APs has probably been the biggest, unexpected benefit,” says Mike Davis. “The 11n clients still make up 80% of the total number of clients and we’ve measured two times the performance of 11n clients on the new 11ac APs over the last generation [11n] APs.”

Wi-Fi uses Ethernet’s carrier sense multiple access with collision detection (CSMA/CD) which essentially checks to see if a channel is being used, and if so, backs off, waits and tries again. “If we’re spending less time on the net, then there’s more airtime available, and so more opportunities for devices to access the media,” says Brown. “More available airtime translates into fewer collisions and backoffs. If an overburdened 11n access point is replaced with an 11ac access point, it will increase the network’s capacity.”

In Aruba’s in-house testing, a Macbook Pro laptop with a three-stream 11n radio was connected to first to the 11n Aruba AP-135, and then to the 11ac AP-225. As shown in Chart #2, “11ac will boost throughput in 11n clients,” the laptop’s performance was vastly better on the 11ac access point, especially as the range increased.

802.11ac

These improvements are part of “wave 1” 11ac. In wave 2, starting perhaps later in 2014, new features will be added to 11ac radios: support four to eight data streams, explicit transmit beam forming, an option for 160 Mhz channels, and “multi-user MIMO,” which lets the access point talk to more than one 11ac client at the same time.

Source:  networkworld.com

Aruba announces cloud-based Wi-Fi management service

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Competes with Cisco-owned Meraki and Aerohive

Aruba Networks today announced a new Aruba Central cloud-based management service for Wi-Fi networks that could be valuable to companies with branch operations, schools and mid-sized networks where IT support is scarce.

Aruba still sells Wi-Fi access points but now is offering Aruba Central cloud management of local Wi-Fi zones, for which it charges $140 per AP annually.

The company also announced the new Aruba Instant 155 AP, a desktop model starting at $895 and available now and the Instant 225 AP for $1.295, available sometime later this month.

A new 3.3 version of the Instant OS is also available, and a new S1500 mobility access switch with 12 to 48 ports starting at $1,495 will ship in late 2013.

Cloud-based management of Wi-Fi is in its early stages and today constitutes about 5% of a $4 billion annual Wi-Fi market, Aruba said, citing findings by Dell’Oro Group. Aruba said it faces competition from Aerohive and Meraki, which Cisco purchased for $1.2 billion last November.

Cloud-based management of APs is ideally suited for centralizing management of branch offices or schools that don’t have their own IT staff.

“We have one interface for multiple sites, for those wanting to manage from a central platform,” said Syliva Hooks, Aruba’s director of product marketing. “There’s remote monitoring and troubleshooting. We do alerting and reports, all in wizard-based formats, and you can group all the APs from location. We’re trying to offer sophisticated functions, but presented so a generalist could use them.”

Aruba relies on multiple cloud providers and multiple data centers to support Aruba Central, Hooks said.

The two new APs provide 450 Mbps throughput in 802.11n for the 155 AP and 1.3 Gbps for the 220 AP, Aruba said. Each AP in a Wi-Fi cluster running the Instant OS can assume controller functions with intelligence built in. The first AP installed in a cluster can select itself as the master controller of the other APs and if it somehow fails, the next most senior AP selects itself as the master.

Source:  networkworld.com

AT&T announces plans to use 700Mhz channels for LTE Broadcast

Thursday, September 26th, 2013

Yesterday at Goldman Sachs’ Communacopia Conference in New York, AT&T CEO Randall Stephenson announced that his company would be allocating the 700Mhz Lower D and E blocks of spectrum that it acquired from Qualcomm in 2011 to build out its LTE Broadcast service. Fierce Wireless reported from the event and noted that this spectrum was destined for additional data capacity. In a recent FCC filing, AT&T put off deploying LTE in this spectrum due to administrative and technical delays caused by the 3G Partnership Project’s continued evaluation of carrier aggregation in LTE Advanced.

No timeline was given for deploying LTE Broadcast, but Stephenson stressed the importance of video to AT&T’s strategy over the next few years.

The aptly named LTE Broadcast is an adaptation of the LTE technology we know and love, but in just one direction. In the case of AT&T’s plans, either 6Mhz or 12Mhz will be available for data transmission, depending on the market. In 6Mhz markets there would be some bandwidth limitations, but plenty enough to distribute a live television event, like the Super Bowl or March Madness. Vitally, since the content is broadcast indiscriminately to any handsets capable of receiving it, there’s no upper limit to the number of recipients of the data. So, instead of having a wireless data network crumble under the weight of thousands of users watching March Madness on their phones and devices at one cell site, the data network remains intact, and everyone gets to watch the games.

Verizon Wireless has a similar proposal in the works, with vague hopes that they’ll be able to be in position to leverage their ongoing relationship with the NFL for the 2014 Super Bowl. Neither Verizon Wireless nor AT&T is hurting for spectrum right now, so it’s nice to see them putting it to good use.

Source:  arstechnica.com

US FDA to regulate only medical apps that could be risky if malfunctioning

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

The FDA said the mobile platform brings its own unique risks when used for medical applications

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration intends to regulate only mobile apps that are medical devices and could pose a risk to a patient’s safety if they do not function as intended.

Some of the risks could be unique to the choice of the mobile platform. The interpretation of radiological images on a mobile device could, for example, be adversely affected by the smaller screen size, lower contrast ratio and uncontrolled ambient light of the mobile platform, the agency said in its recommendations released Monday. The FDA said it intends to take the “risks into account in assessing the appropriate regulatory oversight for these products.”

The nonbinding recommendations to developers of mobile medical apps only reflects the FDA’s current thinking on the topic, the agency said. The guidance document is being issued to clarify the small group of mobile apps which the FDA aims to scrutinize, it added.

The recommendations would leave out of FDA scrutiny a majority of mobile apps that could be classified as medical devices but pose a minimal risk to consumers, the agency said.

The FDA said it is focusing its oversight on mobile medical apps that are to be used as accessories to regulated medical devices or transform a mobile platform into a regulated medical device such as an electrocardiography machine.

“Mobile medical apps that undergo FDA review will be assessed using the same regulatory standards and risk-based approach that the agency applies to other medical devices,” the agency said.

It also clarified that its oversight would be platform neutral. Mobile apps to analyze and interpret EKG waveforms to detect heart function irregularities would be considered similar to software running on a desktop computer that serves the same function, which is already regulated.

“FDA’s oversight approach to mobile apps is focused on their functionality, just as we focus on the functionality of conventional devices. Our oversight is not determined by the platform,” the agency said in its recommendations.

The FDA has cleared about 100 mobile medical applications over the past decade of which about 40 were cleared in the past two years. The draft of the guidance was first issued in 2011.

Source:  computerworld.com

NFL lagging on stadium Wi-Fi

Tuesday, September 3rd, 2013

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/dam/assets/130902121717-levis-stadium-horizontal-gallery.jpg

The consumption of NFL football, America’s most popular sport, is built on game-day traditions.

This week fans will dress head-to-toe in team colors and try out new tailgate recipes in parking lots before filing into 16 NFL stadiums to cheer on their team — which, thanks to the league’s parity, will likely still be in the playoff hunt come December.

But a game-day ritual of the digital age — tracking scores, highlights and social-media chatter on a mobile device — isn’t possible inside many NFL venues because the crush of fans with smartphones can overload cellular networks.

The improved home-viewing experience — high-def TV, watching multiple games at once, real-time fantasy-football updates and interaction via social media — has left some NFL stadiums scrambling to catch up. It’s one of the reasons why, before rebounding last year, the NFL lost attendance between 2008 and 2011, forcing the league to alter television-blackout rules.

In May 2012, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell announced an initiative to outfit all 31 NFL stadiums with Wi-Fi. But with the start of the 2013 regular season just days away, less than half of the NFL’s venues are Wi-Fi enabled and no stadiums have launched new Wi-Fi systems this year.

Part of the reason for the delay is some stadium operators are waiting for the next generation of increased Wi-Fi speed before installing networks, said Paul Kapustka, editor in chief for Mobile Sports Report.

Another reason, Kapustka said, is that the cost of installing Wi-Fi will come out of the pockets of venue owners and operators who have traditionally not needed to invest in such costly projects. Instead, they receive public money to help build stadiums and television money for the right to broadcast games.

“Stadium owners and operators need to get their hands on the fact that they need to put in Wi-Fi like they need to put in plumbing,” Kapustka said.

Brian Lafemina, the NFL’s vice president of club business development, said the league is still searching for a telecommunications partner that can help tackle challenges of stadium location, design and tens of thousands of fans all trying to access the network at the same time.

“Yes, we are working on it as hard as we can,” he said. “But the technology just isn’t where it needs to be to deliver what we want to deliver.”

The league is unveiling a variety of technological enhancements at stadiums in 2013, including cameras in locker rooms, massive video boards that will show replays of every play, a “fantasy football lounge” with sleek technological amenities, the ability to listen to audio of other games from inside the stadium, team specific fantasy games and free access to the league’s NFL Red Zone cable channel for season ticket holders.

Lafemina emphasized the league’s role as a storyteller and said it is striving to use technology to provide fans in stadiums with unique content.

“The most important people in that stadium are the 70,000 paying customers,” he said.

Jonathan Kraft, president of the New England Patriots and co-chair of the NFL’s digital media committee, told CNN Money in January that he hopes to have all stadiums equipped with Wi-Fi for the start of the 2015 season.

The Patriots helped lead the way last year by offering fans free Wi-Fi throughout Gillette Stadium in Foxboro, Massachusetts. The network was built by New Hampshire-based Enterasys Networks.

“We certainly encourage that any club would invest the way they have,” said Lafemina.

Eleven other stadiums currently have Wi-Fi capability: MetLife Stadium in northern New Jersey, the Georgia Dome in Atlanta, Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Raymond James Stadium in Tampa, the Mercedes-Benz Superdome in New Orleans, Bank of America Stadium in Charlotte, Sun Life Stadium in Miami, AT&T Stadium in suburban Dallas, University of Phoenix Stadium in suburban Phoenix, Ford Field in Detroit and Soldier Field in Chicago.

The 20 other stadiums have Wi-Fi in certain areas, but mostly operate on wireless service provided by Verizon and/or AT&T. Many of these venues have installed distributed antenna systems (DAS) to increase wireless connectivity while they seek answers to the challenges of enabling stadiums with Wi-Fi.

DAS connects cellular antennas to a common source, allowing wireless access in large buildings like stadiums.

Mobile Sports Report published its inaugural State of the Stadium Technology Survey this year, based on responses from more than 50 NFL, MLB, NBA, NHL, university, pro soccer, pro golf and car racing sites. The survey concluded DAS is currently more popular at venues because it boosts connectivity to mobile devices while dividing costs between carriers and the facility.

Cleveland Browns fans will benefit from a new DAS tower, installed by Verizon, and an upgraded AT&T tower this year at FirstEnergy Stadium, Browns President Alec Scheiner said the improved technology will serve as a test case for whether to install Wi-Fi in the future.

“If you are a consumer or a fan, you really just care about being able to get on your mobile device, and that’s what we’re trying to tackle,” he said during a July press conference.

Kapustka said DAS is a quick fix and is not a long-term strategy, especially when it comes to fans watching TV replays on their mobile devices.

“The video angle is the big thing for Wi-Fi,” he said. “Cellular just simply won’t be able to handle the bandwidth.”

He also pointed out that it is not in the best business interest of cellphone carriers to install Wi-Fi, as it would take customers off their networks.

Also complicating Kraft’s 2015 goal is the lack of league consensus about who will build Wi-Fi networks in all of its stadiums, and when.

By contrast, Major League Baseball named wireless-tech company Qualcomm its official technology partner in April, launching a two-year study to solve mobile-connectivity issues in its 30 stadiums. Kapustka said MLB was in a position to strike the overarching deal with Qualcomm because team owners made the league responsible for digital properties during the 1990s.

The NFL has a variety of rights deals, including Direct TV and Verizon, which make it more difficult for the league to agree on a single Wi-Fi plan, he said.

“My opinion is they (the NFL) will eventually have something more like MLB,” Kapustka said. “MLB has shown it is a great way to make money.”

Source:  CNN

Intel plans to ratchet up mobile platform performance with 14-nanometre silicon

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Semiconductor giant Intel is to start producing mobile and embedded systems using its latest manufacturing process technology in a bid to muscle in on a market that it had previously ignored.

The company is planning to launch a number of platforms this year and next intended to ratchet up the performance of its offerings, according to sources quoted in the Far Eastern trade journal Digitimes.

By the end of 2013, a new smartphone system-on-a-chip (SoC) produced using 22-nanometre process technology, codenamed “Merrifield”, will be introduced, followed by “Moorefield” in the first half of 2014. “Morganfield”, which will be produced on forthcoming 14-nanometre process manufacturing technology, will be available from the first quarter of 2015.

Merrifield ought to offer a performance boost of about 50 per cent combined with much improved battery life compared to Intel’s current top-end smartphone platform, called Clover Trail+.

More immediately, Intel will be releasing “Bay Trail-T” microprocessors intended for Windows 8 and Android tablet computers. The Bay Trail-T architecture will offer a battery life of about eight hours in use, but weeks when it is idling, according to Digitimes sources.

The Bay Trail-T may be unveiled at the Intel Developer Forum in September, when Intel will also be unveiling “Bay Trail” on which the T-version is based. Bay Trail will be produced on the 22-nanometre Silvermont architecture.

Digitimes was quoting sources among Taiwan-based manufacturers.

Intel’s current Intel Atom microprocessors for mobile phones – such as the Motorola Raxr-I and the Prestigio MultiPhone – are based on 32-nanometre technology, a generation behind the manufacturing process technology that it is using to produce its latest desktop and laptop microprocessors.

However, the roadmap suggests that Intel is planning to produce its high-end smartphone and tablet computer microprocessors and SoC platforms using the same manufacturing technology as desktop and server products in a bid to gain an edge on ARM-based rivals from Samsung, Qualcomm, TSMC and other producers.

Manufacturers of ARM-based microprocessors, which currently dominate the high-performance market for mobile and embedded microprocessors, trail in terms of the manufacturing technology that they can build their systems with, compared to Intel.

Intel, though, has been turning its attention to mobile and embedded as laptop, PC and server sales have stalled.

Source:  computing.com

Amazon is said to have tested a wireless network

Friday, August 23rd, 2013

Amazon.com Inc. (AMZN) has tested a new wireless network that would allow customers to connect its devices to the Internet, according to people with knowledge of the matter.

The wireless network, which was tested in Cupertino, California, used spectrum controlled by satellite communications company Globalstar Inc. (GSAT), said the people who asked not to be identified because the test was private.

The trial underlines how Amazon, the world’s largest e-commerce company, is moving beyond being a Web destination and hardware maker and digging deeper into the underlying technology for how people connect to the Internet. That would let Amazon create a more comprehensive user experience, encompassing how consumers get online, what device they use to connect to the Web and what they do on the Internet.

Leslie Letts, a spokeswoman for Amazon, didn’t respond to a request for comment. Katherine LeBlanc, a spokeswoman for Globalstar, declined to comment.

Amazon isn’t the only Internet company that has tested technology allowing it to be a Web gateway. Google Inc. (GOOG) has secured its own communications capabilities by bidding for wireless spectrum and building high-speed, fiber-based broadband networks in 17 cities, including Austin, Texas and Kansas City, Kansas. It also operates a Wi-Fi network in Mountain View, California, and recently agreed to provide wireless connectivity at Starbucks Corp. (SBUX)’s coffee shops.

Always Trying

Amazon continually tries various technologies, and it’s unclear if the wireless network testing is still taking place, said the people. The trial was in the vicinity of Amazon’s Lab126 research facilities in Cupertino, the people said. Lab126 designs and engineers Kindle devices.

“Given that Amazon’s becoming a big player in video, they could look into investing into forms of connectivity,” independent wireless analyst Chetan Sharma said in an interview.

Amazon has moved deeper into wireless services for several years, as it competes with tablet makers like Apple Inc. (AAPL) and with Google, which runs a rival application store. Amazon’s Kindle tablets and e-book readers have built-in wireless connectivity, and the company sells apps for mobile devices. Amazon had also worked on its own smartphone, Bloomberg reported last year.

Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos is aiming to make Amazon a one-stop shop for consumers online, a strategy that spurred a 27 percent increase in sales to $61.1 billion last year. It’s an approach investors have bought into, shown in Amazon’s stock price, which has more than doubled in the past three years.

Globalstar’s Spectrum

Globalstar is seeking regulatory approval to convert about 80 percent of its spectrum to terrestrial use. The Milpitas, California-based company applied to the Federal Communications Commission for permission to convert its satellite spectrum to provide Wi-Fi-like services in November 2012.

Globalstar met with FCC Chairwoman Mignon Clyburn in June, and a decision on whether the company can convert the spectrum could come within months. A company technical adviser conducted tests that showed the spectrum may be able to accommodate more traffic and offer faster speeds than traditional public Wi-Fi networks.

“We are now well positioned in the ongoing process with the FCC as we seek terrestrial authority for our spectrum,” Globalstar CEO James Monroe said during the company’s last earnings call.

Neil Grace, a spokesman for the FCC, declined to comment.

If granted FCC approval, Globalstar is considering leasing its spectrum, sharing service revenues with partners, and other business models, one of the people said. With wireless spectrum scarce, Globalstar’s converted spectrum could be of interest to carriers and cable companies, seeking to offload ballooning mobile traffic, as well as to technology companies.

The FCC issued the permit to trial wireless equipment using Globalstar’s spectrum to the satellite service provider’s technical adviser, Jarvinian Wireless Innovation Fund. In a letter to the FCC dated July 1, Jarvinian managing director John Dooley said his company is helping “a major technology company assess the significant performance benefits” of Globalstar’s spectrum.

Source:  bloomberg.com