Posts Tagged ‘Aruba Networks’

Aruba announces cloud-based Wi-Fi management service

Tuesday, October 1st, 2013

Competes with Cisco-owned Meraki and Aerohive

Aruba Networks today announced a new Aruba Central cloud-based management service for Wi-Fi networks that could be valuable to companies with branch operations, schools and mid-sized networks where IT support is scarce.

Aruba still sells Wi-Fi access points but now is offering Aruba Central cloud management of local Wi-Fi zones, for which it charges $140 per AP annually.

The company also announced the new Aruba Instant 155 AP, a desktop model starting at $895 and available now and the Instant 225 AP for $1.295, available sometime later this month.

A new 3.3 version of the Instant OS is also available, and a new S1500 mobility access switch with 12 to 48 ports starting at $1,495 will ship in late 2013.

Cloud-based management of Wi-Fi is in its early stages and today constitutes about 5% of a $4 billion annual Wi-Fi market, Aruba said, citing findings by Dell’Oro Group. Aruba said it faces competition from Aerohive and Meraki, which Cisco purchased for $1.2 billion last November.

Cloud-based management of APs is ideally suited for centralizing management of branch offices or schools that don’t have their own IT staff.

“We have one interface for multiple sites, for those wanting to manage from a central platform,” said Syliva Hooks, Aruba’s director of product marketing. “There’s remote monitoring and troubleshooting. We do alerting and reports, all in wizard-based formats, and you can group all the APs from location. We’re trying to offer sophisticated functions, but presented so a generalist could use them.”

Aruba relies on multiple cloud providers and multiple data centers to support Aruba Central, Hooks said.

The two new APs provide 450 Mbps throughput in 802.11n for the 155 AP and 1.3 Gbps for the 220 AP, Aruba said. Each AP in a Wi-Fi cluster running the Instant OS can assume controller functions with intelligence built in. The first AP installed in a cluster can select itself as the master controller of the other APs and if it somehow fails, the next most senior AP selects itself as the master.

Source:  networkworld.com

With faster 5G Wi-Fi coming, Wi-Fi Alliance kicks off certification program

Thursday, June 20th, 2013

Process ensures 802.11ac devices work well with older Wi-Fi products

Although faster fifth-generation Wi-Fi is already available in some new wireless routers and even the new MacBook Air laptops, a new Wi-Fi Certified ac program is being launched today to ensure the newest devices interoperate with other Wi-Fi products.

The Wi-Fi Alliance announced the certification program for 802.11ac Wi-Fi (also known as 5G Wi-Fi). Mobile devices, tablets, laptops, networking gear and other hardware will be available in the last half of 2013 with a Wi-Fi Certified label, ensuring that the devices have been tested to interoperate with other 802.11ac products and older Wi-Fi products.

“The certification program ensures that users can purchase the latest device and not worry if it will work with a device of two years or even 10 years ago,” said Kevin Robinson, senior marketing manager for the Wi-Fi Alliance in an interview.

The faster Wi-Fi allows two-to-three times faster speeds than existing 802.11n technology, Robinson said. It will enhance the speed of movie downloads and other user needs in a home or work place.

Robinson said that 802.11ac should allow a transfer of an HD movie to a tablet in under four minutes, and allow for multiple video streams inside a home at one time. “The average user will notice the difference,” he said, contrary to what some analysts have predicted.

Theoretical maximum speeds on 802.11ac can reach 1.3 Gbps, three times 802.11n’s speeds of 450 Mbps. Older 802.11g supports theoretical speeds of up to 54 Mbps. Actual speeds will be far lower, depending mainly on the number of users and the type of data being transferred.

Aside from faster speeds, 802.11ac allows for more network capacity so that more devices can be simultaneously connected to a network. Because of the added network capacity with 802.11ac, Robinson said that movies can be run without as much less compression, enhancing their overall visual quality. Wi-Fi over 802.11ac also reduces network latency, resulting in fewer delays in streaming music and gaming applications.

Wi-Fi Direct, which is technology to allow device-to-device interoperability with 802.11n, is not yet part of the 802.11ac certification program, Robinson said.

The Wi-Fi Alliance predicts that many of the new routers made with 802.11ac will operate on both the 5GHz and 2.4 GHz bands. That way, 802.11n traffic will be able to run over both bands, while 802.11ac traffic runs over 5GHz. Robinson said that 2.4 GHz will remain sufficient for carrying data for many apps and uses, such as Web browsing. Migrating to 5GHz allows wider spectrum channels with higher data throughputs, yielding higher performance. An advantage of 5 GHz is that various channel widths are supported — 20 MHz, 40 MHz and 80 MHz– while 2.4GHz allows only three 20 MHz channels.

The Wi-Fi Alliance said 11 chips and other components are being used to test new 802.11 ac devices. They are from Broadcom, Intel, Marvell, Mediatek, Qualcomm and Realtek. A list of Wi-Fi Certified ac products is available at www.wi-ficertifiedac.com.

As an indication of the fast industry adoption of 802.11ac, Aruba Networks on May 21 announced new Wi-Fi access points supporting the technology and said more recently that the University of Delaware is a beta customer. Aruba is working for Wi-Fi Certified AC certification of the new access points, a spokeswoman said.

Robinson predicted that many of the recently announced routers and other products will seek Wi-Fi 802.11ac certification.

Source:  computerworld.com

Wireless LAN vendors target surging carrier Wi-Fi market

Monday, February 25th, 2013

Ruckus, Aruba products aim at large-scale, integrated Wi-Fi services

Two wireless LAN vendors are targeting the next big explosion in Wi-Fi growth: hotspots and hotzones created by carriers and other services providers.

Both Ruckus Wireless and Aruba Networks this week at the Mobile World Congress Show in Barcelona outlined products aimed at this provider market. The goal is to be part of a crystallizing of hardware and software that can integrate Wi-Fi with core mobile networks.

As part of its reference design for carrier-based Wi-Fi services, Ruckus announced a new family of outdoor 802.11n access points, the ZoneFlex 7782 series. Four models offer different internal and external antenna configuration options. All have three transmit and three receive antennas supporting three data streams for a maximum data rate of 900Mbps. All three have Ruckus’ patented BeamFlex adaptive antenna technology, designed to boost gain and reduce interference. There’s also a GPS receiver, which service providers can leverage for location-based services.

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Deliberately bland in design, the new Ruckus ZoneFlex 7782 outdoor access point aims at high-performance carrier Wi-Fi networks: dual-band, 3-stream 802.11n with a data rate of nearly 1Gbps.

The company also unveiled a Wi-Fi traffic analysis application for carriers, called the SmartCell Insight analytics engine, which runs on Ruckus’ Smartcell 2000 Gateway, which bridges Wi-Fi and cellular networks. The software sifts out a wealth of data about access point usage, bandwidth, subscriber activity and other metrics, and packs them into a data warehouse. Pre-written and custom reports translate the raw data into information about how well the Wi-Fi network is performing. A battery of standard APIs let carriers export the information to existing data-mining tools and interface with core network applications.

Finally, Ruckus announced SmartPoint, which adds to the ZoneFlex 7321-U access point a USB port that can accept a 3G, 4G, or WiMAX external dongle. The idea is to quickly and easily create a wireless backhaul option where a cable isn’t possible (such as a city bus). Ruckus automatically pushes to the access point the needed driver software for specific 3G/4G/WiMAX dongles. KDDI in Japan, with an extensive WiMAX network, can offer shop owners a Ruckus access point for hotspot Wi-Fi, with a WiMAX dongle for easy backhaul to the Internet.

Both the 7782 outdoor access point, priced at $3,000, and Smartpoint, at $400 are available now; the analytics application, with pricing based on the size of the network, will ship in the second quarter.

Aruba’s carrier play

Aruba, too, is recasting its WLAN architecture via software updates to address carrier requirements for creating a high-capacity, secure and reliable Wi-Fi service for mobile subscribers.

Dubbed Aruba HybridControl, the new code gives Aruba’s 7200 Mobility Controller massive scalability. Aruba says the software update will let the 7200 manage over 32,000 hotspots. That translates into over 100,000 individual access points, because each hotspot can have several of the vendor’s Aruba Instant access points. The scaling lowers carriers’ backend capital costs, cuts data center power demand, and needs less rack space, according to Aruba. The Aruba Instant model offloads cellular traffic locally to the Internet, while centralizes selected traffic such as billing and legal intercept via an IPSec connection to the 7200 controllers at the core.

HybridControl offers “zero-touch activation” for factory-default access points, with no need for any manual pre-provisioning. Switched on, these access points interface with the Aruba Activate cloud service to discover the carrier’s configuration management system and download it. Then, the access points use an assigned X.509 certificate to authenticate with an Aruba controller and set up an IPSec tunnel.

The HybridControl architecture leverages existing Aruba features such as:

  • AppRF, to identify and prioritize real-time applications, such as Microsoft Lync, to create different classes of service;
  • ClearPass Policy Management, a server application to authenticate new access points joining the mobile core network.

The carrier-focused HybridControl offering includes several products: the Aruba 7200 Mobility Controller, available now with prices starting at $38,000; Aruba Instant access points, available now with prices starting at about $400; Aruba Activate, available now and free of charge for Aruba customers. The software update for the 7200 will be available as a free Aruba OS upgrade in the second quarter.

Source:  networkworld.com

Aruba brings Wi-Fi to wall plates

Thursday, January 31st, 2013

The typical Wi-Fi deployment today involves access points deployed in hallways or rooms as standalone boxes. As the move towards pervasive wireless access grows, so too have the demands on wireless infrastructure. That’s where Aruba Networks (NASDAQ:ARUN) is aiming to fill a gap with a new wall mountable access point.

The AP-93H is a 2×2 MIMO 802.11n access point that can be installed on a standard wall mount for wired Ethernet access. The AP-93H has a gigabit uplink port for high-speed connectivity to the wired network for access. The access point is a dual band radio operating in either the 2.4 Ghz or the 5 Ghz ranges. On the software side the device includes the Linux-powered Aruba OS.

Among the target markets for the AP-93H are hotel and dorm room type deployments.

“Over the past few years, the number of mobile devices have really exploded,” Manish Rai, head of Industry Solutions for Aruba, told InternetNews.com. “I think we have reached a tipping point where it makes sense to increase the capacity and move to an in-room deployment for better coverage.”

Source:  wi-fiplanet.com